SGHS Welcomes a New President – Perry Mathewes

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Perry Mathewes is the deputy director, museum operations and director of gardens at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley in Winchester, VA. He oversees the stewardship the museum facilities, historic structures, seven acres of formal gardens and almost 500 acres of grounds including a historic Civil War battlefield. Perry has more than 30 years of experience in the museum and public garden field. Previously he was education program manager and interim director of education and communications for Norfolk Botanical Garden.

Destruction of Garden designed by Clermont Lee

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In the fall of 2015, the Girl Scouts USA, now a corporate entity, sent out a letter asking for monetary gifts to redesign the garden area at the Birthplace. The corporate ideal was to remove the parterred garden, place bluestone pavers in the space, and line it with tropical plantings.

Of Common Mind

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For the last four decades the Southern Garden History Society and Dumbarton Oaks have enjoyed a close relationship. Much of this relationship is based on the shared appreciation

Elizabeth Lawrence: Literary and Horticultural Icon

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Elizabeth Lawrence (1904-1985) is best known as an American garden writer—one of the finest of the 20th century. Through a highly informative yet conversational style of writing, she encouraged her readers to embrace diversity in their gardens by trying something new. Even though she often wrote of her own experiences in her two Southern gardens in North Carolina (Raleigh until 1948, and Charlotte from 1948 to 1984), her audience and correspondences spanned the entire country

SGHS Welcomes Officers and Directors

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We welcome the following officers and directors of SGHS and know they will lead us forward with strength and wisdom. Our new president, Perry Mathewes, shares, “I am looking forward to serving as the next president of the SGHS. I am fortunate to follow in the footsteps of many great leaders for this organization and hope to continue the tradition of service they exemplify. As we move ahead in uncertain times, I know this group will continue to find ways to come together to explore and share the gardening traditions of many great Southern gardens and gardeners.”

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