The Kitchen Garden at Magnolia Mound – by Camm Morton

posted in: Gardens 0

Magnolia Mound’s Kitchen Garden has been a project of the Louisiana Master Gardeners of Baton Rouge for over 15 years. It has seen many changes in those years, the most recent of which is a new shed for our tools and equipment. The funds for the new shed came from BREC.

Magnolia – Winter 2021

posted in: Magnolia 0

The latest Magnolia publication featuring Mount Vernon’s very own Dean Norton is now available.  If you are a member, your beautiful printed copy will be arriving … Read More

COVID Disbands the Choir

posted in: Plant Profiles 0

Something happened around the first of May and the fog began to lift as well as my spirit and the entries and their titles in my journal. “Yucca Earns its Name-Bright Edge,” “Spreading Goodness,”  “Small Wonders,” “Fine Tuning and Max Pruning,” and so on. I don’t think I realized how downhearted I had been. 

Landslide 2020: Women Take the Lead

posted in: Exhibitions 0

For years the contributions of American female landscape architects have been recognized, but perhaps never so poignantly as now. During months of lockdown and pandemic-related upheaval, many people across our country have rediscovered the joys inherent in our landscapes, whether publicly (and socially distanced) or privately (safe at home).

Magnolia – Summer 2020

posted in: Magnolia 0

Within the pages of the Southern Garden History Society’s lastest publication of Magnolia, you will be delighted to find articles such as: Stratford Hall:  An Early … Read More

Ladies and Lubbers

posted in: Plant Profiles 1

Another beautiful species of Lycoris to surprise Southern gardeners in late summer is L. squamigera, known as the magic lily or naked lady. Hardy farther north than L. radiata, which was described on this website in July, L. squamigera flourishes from Maine to Texas, but needs some winter chilling to bloom well.

Garden Restoration at Stratford Hall

posted in: Gardens 0

“In Stratford Hall: An Early Garden Restoration Revisited” Will Rieley, PLA details a project that concluded with returning a significant section of a Colonial Revival garden to a well-informed eighteenth-century configuration. The setting was the

Louisiana’s Natural Treasure: Margaret Stones, Botanical Artist

posted in: Exhibitions 1

Margaret Stones was an Australian botanical artist known for her remarkable watercolor drawings published in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine (Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew), Endemic Flora of Tasmania, and Native Flora of Louisiana. Ms. Stones died in 2018 at the age of 98.  LSU Press published an oversized special folio edition of Native Flora of Louisiana in full color in the same year.

Spider Lily (Lycoris radiata)

For many Southerners, the red spider lily (Lycoris radiata) is a wonderful surprise in the late summer garden. A delicate red flower of fine petals and long stamens perches atop a naked stem, giving it its common name.

SGHS Welcomes a New President – Perry Mathewes

posted in: Uncategorized 0

Perry Mathewes is the deputy director, museum operations and director of gardens at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley in Winchester, VA. He oversees the stewardship the museum facilities, historic structures, seven acres of formal gardens and almost 500 acres of grounds including a historic Civil War battlefield. Perry has more than 30 years of experience in the museum and public garden field. Previously he was education program manager and interim director of education and communications for Norfolk Botanical Garden.

Destruction of Garden designed by Clermont Lee

posted in: News 1

In the fall of 2015, the Girl Scouts USA, now a corporate entity, sent out a letter asking for monetary gifts to redesign the garden area at the Birthplace. The corporate ideal was to remove the parterred garden, place bluestone pavers in the space, and line it with tropical plantings.

Of Common Mind

posted in: Gardens 1

For the last four decades the Southern Garden History Society and Dumbarton Oaks have enjoyed a close relationship. Much of this relationship is based on the shared appreciation

Elizabeth Lawrence: Literary and Horticultural Icon

posted in: Biographies 2

Elizabeth Lawrence (1904-1985) is best known as an American garden writer—one of the finest of the 20th century. Through a highly informative yet conversational style of writing, she encouraged her readers to embrace diversity in their gardens by trying something new. Even though she often wrote of her own experiences in her two Southern gardens in North Carolina (Raleigh until 1948, and Charlotte from 1948 to 1984), her audience and correspondences spanned the entire country

SGHS Welcomes Officers and Directors

posted in: News 0

We welcome the following officers and directors of SGHS and know they will lead us forward with strength and wisdom. Our new president, Perry Mathewes, shares, “I am looking forward to serving as the next president of the SGHS. I am fortunate to follow in the footsteps of many great leaders for this organization and hope to continue the tradition of service they exemplify. As we move ahead in uncertain times, I know this group will continue to find ways to come together to explore and share the gardening traditions of many great Southern gardens and gardeners.”